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1995
• Pier Hotel, Town Pier, Gravesend closed.
• Cold weather and snow in the first week of January. Kent was one of the most badly hit areas with 2 inches of snow falling on New Year’s Day.
• Town bade farewell to one of its best known businessmen, greengrocer and race-horse owner John Heather-West. The funeral procession made its way through the town to Milton church and was led by Mr West’s daughter leading his favourite horse. The traffic in the town came to a halt.
• HRH The Duke of Kent opened 2 new centres at the North West Kent College of Technology, Lower Higham Road, Chalk. The centres are the result of £3.5 million investment. A buffet lunch was prepared for the royal guest by the hospitality centre
• Gravesend Sea Cadets held their last parade at Milton Barracks after the Minitsty Of Defence ordered the cadets to quit their headquarters.
• The Environmental Secretary, John Gummer, visited Gravesend, his former home town to launch the Gravesend Conservatives local government election campaign. He visited St George’s Church and said that the remains of Pocahontas, the first native American to visit Britain, should remain undisturbed. (There had been requests to return her to the United States)
• One in eight town centre retail business premises were closed. Out of 536 ground floor premises, 66 were closed to customers. The worst street was the High Street. Traders demanded action from the council. Primark Store took over the premises previously occupied by the Army and Navy.
• An Open Day at Gravesend Civic Centre took place. Thousands of residents came to see the new foyer, (which allowed easier access for the disabled) various displays, including the Civic Regalia and information on the Rail link and the pedestrianisation of New Road.
• 50 tons of golden sand were imported from Felixstowe in an attempt to restore the beach at the Promenade. It survived the Spring tides, and there were plans to top it up in the summer and make the area more attractive. The experiment was judged a success. (See 1993)
• Plans to transform the area between Milton Place and Ordnance Road into a new leisure area were revealed and comments from the public invited. (See 1992)
• Archaeological finds were discovered near Riverview Park, which included pottery dating back to Roman times and the Iron Age.
• The Gravesham Museum was closed to the public as the new Heritage Centre at Milton Chantry opened in September. Housed in Gravesend’s oldest building the displays tell the story of the town and some of its most famous inhabitants. A joint venture between Kent County Council, Gravesham Borough Council and English Heritage, it was officially opened by the Mayor and the Chairman of Kent County Council. (See 1953, 1970)
• Luxury liner “Crystal Symphony” sailed past Gravesend. Tug boats gave her the traditional full spray salute as the 8 deck passenger ship sailed up the Thames.
• The 50th anniversary of V.E. Day was marked by dozens of street parties and other events in the Gravesend area, including exhibitions and a display of wartime vehicles.
• The first ever Sikh deputy mayor was elected - Makhan Singh.
• The Reverend James Southwold was inducted as the new vicar of St. John’s Church Higham following the previous incumbents move to the Roman Catholic Church. (See 1993)
• Marks & Spencer store in Gravesend had a £1 million refurbishment.
• The BBC Timewatch documentary programme about Pocahontas was filmed in Gravesend and broadcast in October to coincide with the 400th anniversary of her birth.
• There was an outbreak of Hepatitis A in the area - 65 cases were reported - it lasted a few weeks.
• Money from Kent and Essex County Councils was granted to support the Gravesend - Tilbury ferry which had been in decline since 1973. From 780,000 passengers a year the figure had dropped to 170,000.
• The Blockhouse Fort opposite the Clarendon Hotel was once again cleaned up and exposed to view, thanks to the efforts of Victor Smith, local historian. (See 1973, 1975)
• The Disney film “Pocahontas” took America by storm and put Gravesend on the map. Tourists flooded to St. George’s Church. The film was launched in Britain in October and had a special preview showing at the Canon cinema a week ahead of general release. Filmgoers queued around the block and TV crews from around the world were there to record the event. Ticket sales raised £1,500 for the NSPCC. Many other television crews visited the town to broadcast various programmes relating to the film and the history of Pocahontas. The film distributers Buena Vista donated £9000 for St. George’s church to be flood lit. (See 1996)
• St. John’s RC Church, Parrock Street underwent a £120,000 restoration.
• A rare Hawk Moth, found by a resident in Milroy Avenue. This species had not been seen for almost 10 years, due to the use of pesticides.
• There was a reunion for evacuees at Gravesend, for those children who went to Totnes in Devon (Dartington). (See 1940)
• Southern Water pleaded for customers to conserve water after one of the driest periods this century - following unprecedented demand.
• The sail training ship “The Libertad Argentinian” moored off Gravesend. The ship had sailed from Canada, and was on its way to the West India Dock.
• Guru Nanak Kabbadi (Wrestling) Club won the national championships in Birmingham, beating the Birmingham-Midland Kabbadi Club 43-36.
• A young woman plunged 60 feet to her death after she slipped and fell down a disused chalk pit behind Rosherville Primary School. A verdict of accidental death was recorded.
• A bunker in Woodlands Park built to act as a control centre in the event of nuclear attack, could become a museum about the Cold War. This was the hope of Victor Smith, local historian. (See 1954)
• There was a £600,000 refurbishment for Gravesend Railway Station, which took 4 months to complete.
• A battle to keep the town’s Post Office from moving was launched, with a petition signed by 11,000 people handed to the shadow Trade & Industry spokesman.
• A long running dispute over the leadership at the Sikh Temple was resolved when the Charity Commissioners ordered the management to hold an election as they were deemed to have no authority to manage temple affairs. Campaigners had claimed the management had not been properly elected 2 years ago. A 500 signature petition had been handed to the Charity Commissioners.
• A 200 year old shop in the High Street closed. Wards men’s outfitters, which traded as John Rose until 1990, closed due to economic pressures.
• Snow fall in the Gravesend area caused chaos on the roads.
• For the first time in 50 years the Thames & Medway Canal was ready to carry boats again, but there was not enough water, due to the dry summer. The Thames and Medway Canal Association had been restoring the canal for the last 20 years to make 3 miles of canal navigable.
• The Denton area of Gravesend was awarded a £2 million regeneration grant, to be spent on a spine road to take heavy traffic away from residential areas, community projects, creating employment, housing, crime prevention, training and education. The cost to be spread over 7 years.
• A gypsy funeral brought the town to a standstill as 400 mourners joined a procession in a final tribute to Obee Eastwood. The hearse was pulled by four plumed horses. Three carts also held floral tributes and another 3 lorries carried flowers. The procession came from the Dickens Estate to Milton Church, then to the Globe public house and finally to the Gravesend cemetery.
• The Local Government Commission recommended against the merger of Dartford and Gravesham boroughs following the local government review. Local opposition to the proposed merger was very strong.

1996
• Population of Gravesham Borough 92,454.
• Biggest game in the history of Gravesend & Northfleet Football Club took place when they played Aston Villa at Villa Park in Birmingham in the 3rd round of the FA Cup. Gravesend lost 3-0 to Villa.
• The Sikh Temple unanimously elected Sarwan Singh Gill as their new president, following a 2 year dispute. The former president stepped down. The new president will remain in office for 2 years. (See 1993, 1995).
• The Immigration Advisory Service began holding “surgeries” in Gravesend.
• The increasing number of serious and fatal accidents on the A2 opened a debate and the safety of the road was called into question. The possibility of upgrading it to motorway standard was discussed and drivers were also criticised for not taking proper care. There were over 200 accidents and 6 fatalities in a 2 year period. The Government commissioned a study, which confirmed the road to be dangerous and a number of improvements were recommended; including improvements to slip roads and signing. The campaign by the Gravesend Reporter prompted a debate in the House of Commons and Gravesend fire fighters also added their voice to the campaign.
• A big freeze early in the year saw temperatures as low as -120c. There were numerous burst pipes and the roads became treacherous with black ice.
• Smith’s the Bakers went into receivership with the loss of 140 jobs. The business consisted of a bakery and 23 local shops and had been in existence since 1912.
• The Hive shopping centre in Northfleet, originally built in 1968 had a major face-lift costing £150,000, which included the creation of a recreation area, improved parking and lighting.
• Thieves stole the bronze statue of General Gordon, which was on display at the Chantry School in Ordnance Road, Gravesend. (See 1992)
• The National Sea Training School at Chalk merged with the North West Kent College, Lower Higham Road (formerly Gordon School for Girls). (See 1967)
• Safeway store in the Anglesea Centre closed (Safeway superstore in Coldharbour Road had opened in 1994) but another retailer soon moved into the premises. Wilkinson’s, selling housewares, DIY and toiletries, opened in August.
• Labour leader Tony Blair visited Gravesend - arriving by car from Maidstone and returning to London by train.
• A tree blown down in the Great Storm in 1987 was sculpted and put up in Shorne Wood Country Park. The single chestnut log represents man’s struggle with nature and is 7feet high and half a ton in weight.
• Gravesham Mayor Lady Murray visited the birthplace of Pocahontas on an official visit to Gloucester County, Virginia.
• A replica of John Cabot’s ship “Matthew” sailed passed Gravesend on route to Bristol. John Cabot was a 15th century navigator and explorer whose son, Sebastian, (also an explorer) had visited Gravesend in 1553 and 1556.
• Gravesend recorded the highest temperature in the U.K. on two occasions in April with 20.50c. Southern Water warned of possible water supply restrictions to come, due to low rainfall. The highest British temperature of the year up to 7th June was recorded at Gravesend 330c (910f) and 310c (880f) the previous day - this was due to hot air travelling over the continent from Spain.
• Princess Anne visited the new almshouses at Cobham College to mark their recent refurbishment and unveiled a plaque. The Princess was greeted by the oldest resident 93 year old Charles Harper. (See 1362, 1536, 1596, 1956, 1979)
• Blue Circle announced the closure of its cement works at Northfleet within 6 years. After 100 years the mineral resources were almost expired, forcing the closure.
• The BBC TV programme “Songs of Praise” was recorded at Gravesend - it was one of two programmes celebrating the River Thames- and was held on the riverfront by the Clarendon Hotel.
• After research in the Public Record Office, local historian Victor Smith, found plans and documents which revealed the existence of a forgotten 19th century fort in Northfleet. The site is now occupied by housing in the Shepherd Street area. The fort was built in 1806 and housed 208 soldiers and 380 horses, but after the Napoleonic Wars the fort was no longer required and fell into disuse.
• Famous jockey, Lester Piggot opened the new Coral betting shop in King Street, Gravesend.
• The Town Pier was put up for sale. (See 1998)
• The floodlighting of St. George’s Church was completed and switched on in an official ceremony in September. (See 1995)
• There were protests against the plans to discontinue a Sunday and Bank Holiday service on the Gravesend- Tilbury ferry.  
• “The Duke of York” public house, Gravesend Road, Shorne, closed. Re-opened after extensive alterations as “The Copperfield” Restaurant.
• The Zoar Chapel in Peacock Street, built in 1846, was restored by the Reformed Baptist Congregation.
• Fire fighters rescued a horse from sinking into the Denton Sewage Farm. The horse had sunk up to its neck and it took a 20 man team 2 hours to rescue it. The team was comprised of Thames-side and Strood fire stations and the Kent Fire Brigade Animal Rescue Unit.
• The conservatory at Gad’s Hill School was restored and opened by the Lord Lieutenant of Kent. Also present was Cedric Dickens, great grandson of Charles Dickens, who was celebrating his 80th birthday.
• Gravesend Cemetery needed to be enlarged as space for new graves was running out. It was proposed to use land adjacent to the existing cemetery which should last 10-15 years.
• Following the divorce of Prince Charles and Princess Diana it was debated whether the clock in St. George’s Centre commemorating their wedding should stay or be removed. Most residents felt that it should remain in place. (See 1982)
• “The Colonial” public house (previously the “Dickens Inn” built in 1934) at Denton was demolished as part of the regeneration scheme for the area, announced the previous year. The site has remained undeveloped since.
• A lorry driver escaped unhurt when his truck crashed into the Esso garage on the A2 at Pepperhill. The lorry veered across the forecourt, flattened the petrol pumps and ploughed into the shop. The truck burst into flames and fire quickly spread. Residents nearby were evacuated as fire fighters fought the blaze for 3 hours
• Maud Creese MBE, lady Mayor of Gravesend in 1964, died aged 93. She was also founder of the Gravesend branch of the Townswomen’s Guild
• Blue Circle Cement Works, Northfleet produced its 50 millionth tonne of cement clinker - breaking all UK cement manufacturing plant records. It also celebrated the start of a major export programme by investing in ship loading facilities at Northfleet. The first time Northfleet had exported cement for 15 years.