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1993
• Denton branch library closed after a series of attacks of vandalism, arson and decline in use. Opened in 1949, it was the first branch library in the Gravesend area provided by the Borough.
• A new Sikh temple opened in Brandon Street. The Siri Guru Ravidas Gurdwara was converted from the former Brandon Hall.
• The number of unemployed people in Gravesham rose to 5,691 or 12.5% of the population. There were protests outside the Job Centre as job losses increased and fly-posting on empty business premises blaming the government, appeared all over town.
• Work started on the first stretch of a riverside walk, beginning at the Imperial Business Park, providing the first public access at this point since 1902.
• An anti-poll tax campaigner faced jail unless unpaid bill was settled. Protesters in the public gallery caused a scene when the offender was jailed, but after spending a night in jail, the bill was paid.
• Economic regeneration of the East Thames Corridor was unveiled by the government with plans to transform the 30 mile corridor along the riverside from the Docklands to Sheerness, including Gravesham. Creating 128,000 new homes and 182,000 jobs by 2015 and paving the way for development on the back of improvements to the areas transport infrastructure, including the rail link.
• The Co-op dairy in Churchill Road, Gravesend, closed after 50 years of business and the loss of 100 jobs.
• A new river taxi service was launched by White Horse Ferries, running from the Town Pier to Canary Wharf. Later in the year the company collapsed and the service discontinued.
• A Sikh man was attacked in Denton on his way home and a youth was later charged with grievous bodily harm. The attack increased fear amongst the Sikh community as further incidents occurred and right wing leaflets were distributed. The Sikh festival of Vaisakhi was celebrated with a procession through the town, and passed off without incident.
• Two tons of cannabis with a street value of £5 million was seized from a barge at Gravesend, the biggest drugs seizure in the town and one of the largest on the Thames.
• Following complaints Southern Water invested £330,000 in a dry vapour blower to distribute 5,000 cubic feet of scented air per minute across the sewage works at Denton in an effort to eliminate odour problems.
• With the growing numbers of empty shops in the town centre it was suggested that murals could be painted on the boarded up premises to help brighten up the streets. This was executed the following year.
• Post bus routes in Gravesham were launched with a service to Betsham/Southfleet and one to Fairseat, running three times a day making passenger and postal pick ups.
• Mud threatened to engulf the last few remaining feet of Gravesend beach off the Promenade. A blocked storm water pipe also caused the promenade to flood, dissuading visitors. The Promenade had attracted thousands of people in the 40’s and 50’s. (See 1995)
• A five man crew from two Gravesend pubs shattered a 6 year record when they rowed 123 miles down the Thames. They rowed through thunder and lightning, lashing rain and six foot waves, in 38 hours and 44 minutes, taking 43 minutes off the record. Their achievement was entered in the Guinness Book of Records.
• The rivers Thames and Medway were linked in a twinning ceremony, which was last performed in 1860. Seven crews rowed five man skiffs from Rochester Bridge to Gravesend a distance of 40 miles.
• A new pilot boat the “Estuary Escort” was launched at the Royal Terrace Pier.
• The Town’s first Heritage Day was held in June with various events, including a guided tour of the historic town, open days at historic buildings and street entertainment.
• A blaze at Denton wharf where 1,000 tons of waste paper went up in flames. It took 10 fire crews more than 3 hours to bring it under control. A fire-fighting tug was also used to pump water from the Thames.
• Jugnu Bhangra dancers performed at the National Eisteddford in Wales, winning 3rd place. They were given an honorary civic reception by the Mayor.
• Gravesend waterman, James Clifford, won the 279th Doggets Coat & Badge race. (See 1715, 1882, 1997)
• A Ten Pin Bowling Alley was officially opened on 20th August at the Imperial Business Estate.
• Countess Mountbatten of Burma visited the new Sikh sports centre the Siri Guru Nanak Education and Sports complex at Milton Barracks.  The centre cost £250,000.
• Dockers at Imperial Wharf, Gravesend, discovered a consignment of cannabis with a street value of more than £1 million hidden in a cargo of nut-palm kernels. The haul was the second biggest on the Thames that year.
• One of India’s top Kabbadi (Wrestling) teams from Bombay, visited Gravesend and demonstrated the sport at the Guru Nanak Sports Centre. The visiting team were given a civic reception.
• The Vicar at St. John’s Church, Higham decided to convert to Catholicism in protest at the ordaining of women as priests in the Church Of England. The village row reached its peak when the Rev. Tony Pinchin appeared on TV and was featured in a national newspaper. About 40 of the congregation supported him and the remainder were determined to worship under the Church of England.
• A petition was presented to Gravesham Borough Council to save the Ebbsfleet Valley from development, and prevent the building of an International Rail Station on the site. The campaign against the Rail Link was stepped up. The Gravesham MP Jacques Arnold gained permission to hold an adjournment debate on the impact of the proposed Rail Link on the Borough. The announcement of the final route of the link was delayed and it was not certain when construction would begin. Later a petition with 7,723 names calling for it to bypass homes at Pepperhill was presented to Parliament by the MP. It asked for a tunnel to skirt the houses and go under the nearby electricity substation.
• A new president of Guru Nanak Darbar Sikh Temple, Amar Yadwinder, was voted in amidst controversy over the election and allegations of rigging. (See 1995, 1996)
• A bomb hoax paralysed the town, when hundreds of shoppers were evacuated and traffic halted, while the bomb disposal squad dealt with it.
• The annual Thames Fishery Research Experiment showed the Thames getting cleaner, with 8 different species of fish identified.
• Gravesend was chosen as the place for the first day centre for ethnic minorities. Located at 11 The Grove, the Guru Nanak Day and Family Centre was officially opened.
• The first November snowfall for 24 years throughout the area.
• Town traders called for Sunday trading laws to be changed, although many opposed it. The Government eventually amended the law allowing small shops to open any time on a Sunday, and larger stores and supermarkets to open for up to 6 hours on a Sunday.
• The restoration of the traditional swing bridge on the Thames and Medway Canal at Higham, was marked by using a Shire horse to open it. The bridge was originally built to allow carts to cross the canal.

1994
• New Muslim Community Centre opened on the site of the former “Phoenix Tavern” in Albion Terrace. Activities at the centre included prayers, lectures, language classes and women’s meetings.
• Town traders petitioned the Borough Council to fully pedestrianise King Street and not allow buses through as fears for the safety of shoppers increased.
• Scott Paper Mill, Northfleet announced 200 jobs to be axed.
• Books in Chinese and a Chinese daily newspaper were stocked at Gravesend Library to serve the growing Chinese community.
• A portrait of Robert Pocock by local artist Douglas Waters was presented to the Borough Council by members of the Gravesend Historical Society to commemorate the 234th anniversary of Pocock’s birth. (See 1760)
• The Friends of Cobham Church raised £46,000 for the church bells to be repaired.
• Safeway Superstore was opened in Coldharbour Road, Northfleet by Henry Cooper (former heavyweight boxing champion) together with the Mayor.
• Sainsbury’s store in the St. George’s Centre closed and was taken over by Kwik Save food store.
• A cut and cover tunnel under the A2 and around the Pepperhill housing estate was chosen by the Government as the route for the Rail Link to take - a victory for the campaigners. Ebbsfleet was chosen as the site for an international and domestic railway station. Environmentalists called for the Government to change its mind, whilst the council and MP believed it would bring prosperity and economic opportunites to the area.
• Wombwell Hall, former girls school and home of the Colyer-Fergusson family was demolished, much to the dismay of local residents. The Borough Council took the two companies responsible to court for failing to give proper notice of the demolition and won the case. Both companies were fined £2,000 + costs. (See 1860)
• A D-Day veteran from Northfleet became the first ex-serviceman to be awarded a commemorative medal by the French Government, to mark the 50th anniversary of the D-Day landings.
• Labour leader John Smith came to Gravesend, visiting the police station and crime prevention unit and talked to local Labour Party members.
• The newly refurbished market square was opened by the Mayor. The area was completely resurfaced for the open air market to take place on Saturdays and as a car park during the week.
• The first ordination of women into the priesthood from the Gravesend area took place.
• The two 500 foot chimneys of Northfleet Power Station were demolished. A large crowd gathered to watch the chimneys being blown up. (See 1960)
• HMS “Cygnet” was decommissioned. The crew were given a civic reception by the mayor. (See 1943)
• Gravesend Reference Library was refurbished and a first stop information shop with computer data base of local information was installed for public use.
• The Thames Fishery Research experiment revealed 9 species of fish present in the River Thames, showing the improving condition of the river. The biggest silver eel was caught in the river for 26 years, at 3 feet 8 inches long, weighing 5 pounds and having a diameter of 5 inches.
• Unemployment in the area was decreasing, with 4,755 people out of work in September.
• The refurbished New Road pedestrian zone was officially opened. It took 6 months to complete at a cost of £300,000. Trees were planted, a decorative gate installed, new street lighting and seating and a new road block surface was laid.
• Archaeological work at Springhead led to new discoveries about the Roman town (Vagniacae) that was sited there, which included a major Roman road, a cemetery and several buildings, including temples. (See 56AD, 150, 190, 300, 1998)