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1968
• Milton Congregational Church, Clarence Place, became the Sikh Temple (Gurdwara Guru Nanak) and in November 3,000 Sikhs crowded into England’s biggest Temple for its official opening.
• Huggen’s College almshouses in Northfleet were demolished and Wallis Park flats built. (See 1847)
• West Street railway line closed to goods traffic (passenger traffic finished in 1953).
• The final service at St. James’s Church took place in February before it was demolished. (It was the parish church of Gravesend between 1952-1968). St. George’s once again became the parish church of Gravesend.
• The Duke of Edinburgh and Prince Charles came ashore at Royal Terrace Pier to visit the Thames Navigation Centre.
• Concern over high unemployment figures brought about a meeting to discuss the effect of economic planning in the South East.
• A 20lb eel, measuring 5 feet, was found in the screens at Northfleet power station. The eel appeared “on the table of a group of local OAP’s”.
• The opening ceremony was performed on phase one of the £256,117 Northfleet High Street redevelopment scheme. It consisted of 15 two-bed flats, 12 one-bed flats, 24 three-bed maisonettes, 13 shops and 28 garages, and was named “The Hive”. (See 1996) The name derived from the large residence Hive House and its surrounding Park, which once stood there. The house and lands were divided and sold during the second half of the 19th century.
• The new Civic Centre in Windmill Street was officially opened by the Duchess of Kent.
• Thamesview Secondary School, Thong Lane, opened in September.
• Women from Gravesend and district went to County Hall, Maidstone to protest against the increase in evening class charges by 300%.
• Three Royal Navy submarines passed Gravesend on their way to Surrey Commercial Docks for visits by the public.

1969
• Chalk Village hall was opened. Much of the work was completed by voluntary workers, led by the Vicar, Rev. Jim Fry.
• Marling Cross Branch library opened.
• In April the last public social function was held at the old Town Hall in the High Street. The Magistrates Court was extended to occupy the old building. (See 2000)
• Over 600 people attended the borough’s First Civic Open day. They took a look behind the scenes of local government. (See 1995)
• The last surviving pawnbrokers shop in Stone Street, Gravesend was closed. The shop was originally opened in 1835.
• Gravesend’s only amusement arcade opened at the Town Pier, as part of an extensive plan for the pier, to include dancing and a catering centre.
• 500 men at Northfleet Power Station staged an unofficial walk out, shutting the station down and sending fears of power failures through half the country.
• Gravesend Cricket, Lawn Tennis and Bowling Club Ltd (Bat & Ball) launched an appeal for funds to restore the ground to its former condition to ensure the return of County Cricket to Gravesend once again.
• With the departure of the 1st Battalion, the Welch Regiment, Gravesends Milton Barracks were empty, with no plans for another major unit to come to Gravesend. (See 1862) The barracks were sold to Kent County Council who later sold part of it for housing development. (See 1980)
• Fire destroyed part of the British Uralite factory at Higham. Damage was estimated at £25,000.
• The Sports centre at Thong Lane was officially opened at a cost of £120,000 (Previously the site of the wartime airfield. See 1939).
• Salvation Army Citadel in New Road, “Eagle” public house and builders yard all demolished for re-development.

1970
• The Gravesend one way system came into force on 4 January. In order for the scheme to work, the “Sun” public house, situated at the top of Bath Street was demolished, Royal Pier Road became a cul-de-sac and Crooked Lane was realigned. There were no pedestrianised or traffic free zones as with the present day system.
• Mr Gurmit Singh Thandi became the first Indian pub landlord when he took over the “Town Arms”, Queen Street.
• New Northfleet cement works began production. Believed to be the largest of its kind in the world, it was built by APCM Ltd. for Blue Circle Cement.
• The Mitre Hotel on the corner of Queen Street and King Street, closed down and was subsequently demolished.
• Refurbishment of St. George’s Church took place. A new rectory and church hall opened.
• Rosherville Hotel, Burch Road, Northfleet was demolished to make room for industrial development.
• The last Gravesend shrimping boat (Bawley boat) the “Thistle” was sold.
• Gravesend power station in Suffolk Road was closed. It had been the cheapest electricity producer in the country during the 1920’s and 30’s, charging only a farthing (one quarter of an old Penny) a unit in the summer months.
• The houses in Nine Elms Grove and Clifton Grove were demolished and redeveloped by the council to provide council housing.
• A new Tesco store was built in New Road, Gravesend, on the site of the Salvation Army Citadel.
• Gravesend Museum was transferred from the Milton Chantry to the former Police station in the old Town Hall building in the High Street. (See 1953, 1982, 1995)
• St. Andrew’s Waterside Mission Church closed and declared redundant the following year.
• Kent Messenger newspaper office in Stone Street closed after 70 years.
• Homemead and later Gravesham Court flats opened on the site of Peter Street and part of Peppercroft Street where the houses had been demolished for redevelopment. The flats cost £869,000 to build, with 9 storeys containing 234 flats.
• The “Tin mission” in Dashwood Road demolished. Built in 1904 serving southwest Gravesend before the erection of St. Mary’s Church in Wrotham Road in 1938, it served as St. Mary’s Church hall until a new hall was opened next to the church in November and dedicated by the Bishop of Rochester the following month.
• Hevercourt Old People’s Home, Goodwood Crescent, Singlewell opened.
• Outdoor market extension opened.
• Painters Ash School, Northfleet opened.

1971
• A new wing of Gravesend Hospital opened - maternity and general medical unit which cost £734,000.
• The last house in Park Place, built in 1834, was demolished. (See 1959)
• An observatory at St. George’s School, Gravesend, officially opened by Sir William Hodge, professor emeritus (retired) of astronomy and geometry at Cambridge University. The scheme was the culmination of 25 years work for head of science teacher Mr. R.G. Rice. In the autumn new buildings costing £179,000 were opened at the school. (See 1955)
• The lower part of Queen Street was demolished, including the former homes of many Gravesend shrimping families. Later in the year, Terrace Street, Gravesend was demolished ready for redevelopment.
• The Tollgate Motel, on the A2 was extended by 60 rooms.
• A plaque commemorating the pilots of 501 & 66(F) Squadrons, based at Gravesend, who died during the Battle of Britain was unveiled on a wall outside the leisure centre in Thong Lane (site of the airfield). It was later moved inside.
• Quarter sessions at Gravesend ended. From 1837 Gravesend had a separate commission of the peace and a quarter session since 1849. Reorganisation in the courts meant that larger units were replacing borough wide institutions.
• St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Children’s Home (formerly Milton Mount College), near Echo Square, was demolished to make way for a housing development. (See 1871)
• Northfleet Old People’s Day Centre opened in Vale Road, the building was the former Civil Defence HQ. (See 1989)
• Population of Gravesend and Milton 54,106. Population of Northfleet 26,718.

1972
• Canal basin restored as a marina.
• Northfleet Urban District Council unveiled plans to redevelop the south side of Northfleet High Street.
• Cobham College, which was condemned as unfit to live in by Strood Rural District Council, was reprieved and made ready for flats to be upgraded once the occupants had left them vacant. (See 1362, 1536, 1596, 1956, 1979, 1996)
• Stained glass window panes of St Mildred’s Church, Nurstead, were destroyed by vandals at an estimated cost of £1,000.
• Steam tug “Contest” (built in 1933) finished its work on the Thames and was broken up for scrap, leaving the “Challenger” the last working Thames steam tug, until a few weeks later when this was also withdrawn from service, ending the steam era on the Thames.
• In July Mr James Benson, a well known local historian died aged 94. Author of a history of Gravesend and innumerable articles in the Gravesend Reporter over 60 years.
• The 18 month old church hall of St. Mary’s Church, Wrotham Road, Gravesend was destroyed by fire, caused by arsonists. The hall was rebuilt the following year.
• Milton Chantry was taken over by the Department of the Environment under a deed of guardianship, executed with Gravesend Borough Council. The building underwent restoration work. (See 1995)
• Gurchan Singh Wasu became the first Sikh magistrate. (See 1991)
• An experimental scheme banning all traffic from Gravesend High Street, with the exception of delivery vehicles, was started.
• The old Police station in Windmill Street (built in 1940) was demolished prior to the erection of a new six storey building costing £500,000. (See 1975)
• The Cannon Cinema, formerly the ABC, King Street, became a triple screen cinema. (See 1931, 1963, 2000)
• The spire on St. Mary’s Church, Lower Higham was re-shingled.

1973
• The foundations of Henry VIII’s blockhouse (1543), were re-discovered by local historians- sited on the lawn in front of the Clarendon Hotel. (See 1975)
• St James’s institute, Darnley Road was demolished. The institute was part of St. James’s Church land. (See 1968)
• Luddesdown residents at the parish council, decided to restore their village hall rather than demolish it. The hall was built in 1863 and was originally the village school.
• Nightingale Close, Northfleet was opened by Anthony Crossland MP, Shadow Housing minister. This was the latest in a long line of warden controlled housing for the elderly in Northfleet Urban District.
• Trumans Brewery announced its intention to replace landlords with managers at 10 local public houses, including Whitehill Tavern, White Post, Nelson Hotel, Prince of Orange, Central Hotel, Dickens Inn, Denton, Leather Bottle in Northfleet and Leather Bottle in Cobham.
• The first Pelican Crossing in the area was sited at Chalk.
• In April Gravesend Borough Council held a referendum on the town’s shopping hours. The result was to allow Wednesday afternoon to become part of normal shopping hours, instead of being a half-day, thus allowing shopping 6 days a week.
• Windmill Hill residents formed an association to protect Gravesend’s famous landmark from unwanted developments. However, they were powerless to stop the demolition of the water tower on the hill despite protests for its preservation.
• Elections were held for the new Gravesham Borough Council which was due to take control of the existing 3 local authorities on 1st April 1974. The Labour party won control of the new council with a 12 seat majority.
• Harold Wilson (Former Prime Minister and leader of the opposition) opened Hurst-Skeffington house on the Overcliffe, for Autistic youth.
• The roof of Raynehurst Infant School, Riverview Park, was destroyed by fire.